Quartzy, an Email Newsletter

Quartzy, which officially launched Friday, is taking an organic approach to growth and had 14,000 subscribers by the end of its first day. The newsletter is actually a second for the Atlantic Media-owned company, following the Daily Brief, which has grown to 250,000 daily subscribers since its launch and seen a consistent open rate of around 40 percent. According to Joy Robins, Quartz’s svp of global revenue and strategy, the newsletters are meant to engage current readers while also helping Quartz branch out into new verticals. (Quartz’s overall audience also continues to grow. Between July and September, it had an average of 18 million monthly unique visitors, according Omniture.)

“We always want to create content for humans—not robots,” Robins said. “We want to create products for the right people, how they are actually wanting to be spoken to as technology evolves.”

In the next few weeks, Shinola will become the first brand to advertise with Quartzy as part of a broader cross-channel campaign being paid for by the Detroit-based maker of watches, bicycles and notebooks. The number of consumer brands advertising with Quartz has doubled in the past year, growing from fewer than 20 in 2015 to more than 40 so far this year. (Consumer brands now make up slightly more than a quarter of Quartz’s overall advertiser base.)

Lately, Shinola has been experimenting with all sorts of digital media, such as a recent 360-degree video starring Luke Wilson. Earlier this year, the brand teamed up with Viceland for a series highlighting Shinola’s employees.

Lifestyle stories aren’t entirely new to Quartz. The publication has been gradually upping its variety since launching four years ago. The company hired Avins and other writers in 2014 to focus more heavily on stories about fashion, food and travel. Robins said Quartzy will distinguish itself by its visual nature, which she said should appeal to advertisers wanting to engage readers visually.

The newsletters are focused on the most quartzy of Quartz readers: people in their late 30s, highly educated, travel well, have a senior role and have an average of more than 3,000 Twitter followers. (That composite was created from an annual survey the company conducted last year.)

Quartzy, which officially launched Friday, is taking an organic approach to growth and had 14,000 subscribers by the end of its first day. The newsletter is actually a second for the Atlantic Media-owned company, following the Daily Brief, which has grown to 250,000 daily subscribers since its launch and seen a consistent open rate of around 40 percent. According to Joy Robins, Quartz’s svp of global revenue and strategy, the newsletters are meant to engage current readers while also helping Quartz branch out into new verticals. (Quartz’s overall audience also continues to grow. Between July and September, it had an average of 18 million monthly unique visitors, according Omniture.)

“We always want to create content for humans—not robots,” Robins said. “We want to create products for the right people, how they are actually wanting to be spoken to as technology evolves.”

In the next few weeks, Shinola will become the first brand to advertise with Quartzy as part of a broader cross-channel campaign being paid for by the Detroit-based maker of watches, bicycles and notebooks. The number of consumer brands advertising with Quartz has doubled in the past year, growing from fewer than 20 in 2015 to more than 40 so far this year. (Consumer brands now make up slightly more than a quarter of Quartz’s overall advertiser base.)

Lately, Shinola has been experimenting with all sorts of digital media, such as a recent 360-degree video starring Luke Wilson. Earlier this year, the brand teamed up with Viceland for a series highlighting Shinola’s employees.

Lifestyle stories aren’t entirely new to Quartz. The publication has been gradually upping its variety since launching four years ago. The company hired Avins and other writers in 2014 to focus more heavily on stories about fashion, food and travel. Robins said Quartzy will distinguish itself by its visual nature, which she said should appeal to advertisers wanting to engage readers visually.

The newsletters are focused on the most quartzy of Quartz readers: people in their late 30s, highly educated, travel well, have a senior role and have an average of more than 3,000 Twitter followers. (That composite was created from an annual survey the company conducted last year.)

Quartzy, which officially launched Friday, is taking an organic approach to growth and had 14,000 subscribers by the end of its first day. The newsletter is actually a second for the Atlantic Media-owned company, following the Daily Brief, which has grown to 250,000 daily subscribers since its launch and seen a consistent open rate of around 40 percent. According to Joy Robins, Quartz’s svp of global revenue and strategy, the newsletters are meant to engage current readers while also helping Quartz branch out into new verticals. (Quartz’s overall audience also continues to grow. Between July and September, it had an average of 18 million monthly unique visitors, according Omniture.)

“We always want to create content for humans—not robots,” Robins said. “We want to create products for the right people, how they are actually wanting to be spoken to as technology evolves.”

In the next few weeks, Shinola will become the first brand to advertise with Quartzy as part of a broader cross-channel campaign being paid for by the Detroit-based maker of watches, bicycles and notebooks. The number of consumer brands advertising with Quartz has doubled in the past year, growing from fewer than 20 in 2015 to more than 40 so far this year. (Consumer brands now make up slightly more than a quarter of Quartz’s overall advertiser base.)

Lately, Shinola has been experimenting with all sorts of digital media, such as a recent 360-degree video starring Luke Wilson. Earlier this year, the brand teamed up with Viceland for a series highlighting Shinola’s employees.

Lifestyle stories aren’t entirely new to Quartz. The publication has been gradually upping its variety since launching four years ago. The company hired Avins and other writers in 2014 to focus more heavily on stories about fashion, food and travel. Robins said Quartzy will distinguish itself by its visual nature, which she said should appeal to advertisers wanting to engage readers visually.

The newsletters are focused on the most quartzy of Quartz readers: people in their late 30s, highly educated, travel well, have a senior role and have an average of more than 3,000 Twitter followers. (That composite was created from an annual survey the company conducted last year.)

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